Put In Their Place (Rondel Grande)

Put In Their Place (Rondel Grande)

After all, we have slaves drawn from every corner of the world in our households, practicing strange customs, and foreign cults, or none––and it is only by means of terror that we can hope to coerce such scum.

Tacitus

From the farthest reaches, they’re here:
Brought by our magnetic power,
Yielding to our swords’ flashing steel,
Beneath our whips’ bite they cower,
Seen as scum of the earth.

How they resist our clear commands!
O the terrors we have to use
To keep these savages’ vile hands
At work, lest our treasures we lose,
Seen as scum of the earth.

6-1-2020

What is a rondel grande?

The Sower (Shakespearean Sonnet)

The Sower (Shakespearean Sonnet)

The Sower gathered his bag, went to sow––
his furrows dug long and straight in the dirt;
countless burial mounds without a stone,
bodies tenderly laid to rest in earth.
In the darkness of each tomb, death unseen
reigns, his grievous, painful scepter holds sway
until the dust returns to its own, keen
for the glorious freedom of the Day.
Up from the decaying, dusting husk shoots
an arm, desperate for air and for sun––
defying the dark lord, declaring, “Soon!
Your fearful tyranny at last be done!”
So many planted seeds to die in me,
but day by day I’m becoming more green.

5-14-2020

What is a Shakespearean sonnet?

Seeds

Seeds

A planted seed is
     buried alive,
     waterboarded,
     and left to die.

Life planted as seeds
     must bring death
     for life to sprout––

               through the dirty grave,
               treading the waters,
               grasping for sunshine,
                         basking in its warmth,
                         living in its life.

5-14-2020